This issue takes up the role of disorganization and the relations between order and disorder in organization studies and everyday life. Rather than juxtapositioning these features as oppositions, the issue explores how to understand other aspects of the often unwanted and dark sides of disorganization and disorder - by scrutinising how they are entangled and mutually constitutive to organization practice and theory. A rich array of contributions critically debate and flesh out different matters of dis/organization in contexts such as mental health care, public schools and higher education, precarious labour market, and populist movements. Through this, the issue offers nuanced theoretical developments and empirical insights to the obvious, subtle and unexpected workings of disorganization and disorder in the creation of that which we typically recognize as organizational order.